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Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection

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Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection

About this collection

Principal Investigator
Creators
Contributors
Date Issued
  • 2015
Date Collected
  • 2008-2015
Cite This Work

Rayner, Keith; Abbott, Matthew J; Schotter, Elizabeth R; Belanger, Nathalie N; Higgins, Emily C; Leinenger, Mallorie; von der Malsburg, Titus; Plummer, Patrick (2015): Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection. UC San Diego Library Digital Collections. http://dx.doi.org/10.6075/J0JW8BSV

Description

This collection consists of eye movement data from published studies conducted in Keith Rayner’s Eyetracking Lab in the Department of Psychology at UCSD. The collection does not represent one project, but rather a snapshot of the work produced by Rayner’s highly productive lab from his arrival at UCSD in 2008 until he passed away in 2015. During this time, Rayner published more than 130 papers with collaborators at UCSD and around the world. Included in this collection are data and materials from 15 studies that were conducted in-house, and so the collection reflects the subset of work carried out primarily by Rayner’s graduate students, post-docs, and research assistants at UCSD.

Rayner’s academic interests were broad, but much of his work focused on how visual and cognitive processes guide eye movements in reading, visual search, and scene perception. This collection consists of data from reading studies, and covers a range of topics (e.g., parafoveal processing, phonological coding, lexical ambiguity, word predictability), paradigms (e.g., gaze-contingent display change, proofreading), and populations (e.g., undergraduate students, deaf adult readers, bilinguals). Each package is a complete set of data and materials from published studies, some of which contain multiple experiments. Our goals are to make a rich source of information accessible to interested researchers to satisfy a variety of inquiries, and to preserve some of the work from Rayner’s lab for the future.

Each data package contains (1) a “Readme” file with a detailed description of the package contents, (2)  a “Data” directory, which consists of both raw and processed data in most cases, and (3) a “Materials” directory, containing the relevant experiment scripts or files with details about the words and/or sentences that were presented. In addition, some packages contain data processing and analysis scripts (e.g., .R files) to facilitate reanalysis. Within the Readme file is contact information for both the corresponding author for the published paper as well as the lab member who compiled the data package. Questions regarding the data package itself should be directed to the compiler, while questions regarding the design of materials, data analysis or interpretation should be directed to the corresponding author.

Rayner’s contributions to Experimental Cognitive Psychology are many, including advancing theory, discovering phenomena, and developing novel eyetracking methodologies. Eyetrackers enable precise measurement of where and for how long readers position their eyes (i.e., during fixations) and where they move next (i.e., via saccades). By knowing where people look, we are able to control what readers are able to see both within central vision and outside of it (i.e., in the parafovea) on each eye fixation via the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975). With this paradigm, Rayner demonstrated that readers frequently access information about the upcoming word before looking at it, and that having incorrect information about the word that ultimately appears once it is directly looked at slows reading.  Many of the packages in this collection contain data from experiments employing this paradigm.

Throughout his career, Rayner and his family of researchers (students, post-docs, and local and international collaborators) made a number of important advances to our understanding of how eye movements reflect information processing in reading. The collection contains studies comparing different groups of readers (keywords: College students, Adults (25-45), Seniors (65-95),  Deaf individuals, Bilingual individuals), using different experimental methods (keywords: Gaze-contingent display change, Moving window paradigm, Proofreading), and examining various empirical and theoretical issues (keywords: Word identification, Sentence processing, Word frequency, Word predictability, Sentence context, Lexical ambiguity, Preview benefit, Parafoveal processing, Reading ability).

Extent

16 digital objects.

Scope And Content

The collection is organized into 16 objects; 15 are complete data packages (each pertains to one published paper) and 1 is a toolkit containing open-source data processing tools and corresponding documentation.

If you plan to publish a paper using data from the collection, please contact the corresponding author of the published paper.

Topics
Related Publications

Abbott, M.J., Angele, B., Ahn, Y.D., & Rayner, K. (2015). Skipping syntactically illegal “the” previews: The role of predictability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 41, 1703-1714. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000142

Angele, B., & Rayner, K. (2013). Processing the in the parafovea: Are articles skipped automatically? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 649-662. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029294

Angele, B., Tran, R., & Rayner, K. (2013). Foveal-parafoveal overlap can facilitate ongoing word identification during reading. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39, 526-538. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029492

Belanger, N.N., Mayberry, R.I., & Rayner, K. (2013). Orthographic and phonological preview benefits: Parafoveal processing in skilled and less-skilled deaf readers. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66, 2237-2252. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2013.780085

Belanger, N.N., Slattery, T.J., Mayberry, R.I., & Rayner, K. (2012). Skilled deaf readers have an enhanced perceptual span during reading. Psychological Science, 23, 816-823. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797611435130

Gollan, T.H., Slattery, T.J., Goldenberg, D., van Assche, E., Duyck, W., & Rayner, K. (2011). Frequency drives lexical access in reading but not in speaking: The frequency-lag hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 140, 186-209.
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0022256

Leinenger, M., & Rayner, K. (2013). Eye movements while reading biased homographs: Effects of prior encounter and biasing context on reducing the subordinate bias effect. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 25, 665-681. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20445911.2013.806513

Plummer, P., Perea, M., & Rayner, K. (2013). The influence of contextual diversity on eye movements in reading. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 40, 275- 283. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0034058

Rayner, K., & Schotter, E.R. (2014). Semantic preview benefit in reading English: The effect of initial letter capitalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40, 1617-1628. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036763

Rayner, K., Slattery, T.J., Drieghe, D., & Liversedge, S.P. (2011). Eye movements and word skipping during reading: Effects of word length and predictability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37, 514-528. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0020990

Rayner, K, Yang, J., Schuett, S., & Slattery, T.J. (2013). Eye movements of older and younger readers when reading unspaced text. Experimental Psychology, 60, 354-361. http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1618-3169/a000207

Rayner, K., Yang, J., Schuett, S., & Slattery, T.J. (2014). The effect of foveal and parafoveal masks on the eye movements of older and younger readers. Psychology and Aging, 29, 205-212. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036015

Schotter, E.R., Bicknell, K., Howard, I., Levy, R., & Rayner, K. (2014).Task effects reveal cognitive flexibility responding to frequency and predictability: Evidence from eye movements in reading and proofreading. Cognition, 131, 1-27. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2013.11.018

Schotter, E.R., Tran, R., & Rayner, K. Don’t believe what you read (only once) (2014): Comprehension is supported by regressions during reading. Psychological Science, 25, 1218-1226. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797614531148

Slattery, T.J., Angele, B., & Rayner, K. (2011). Eye movements and display change detection during reading. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37, 1924-1938. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0024322

Formats

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Language
  • English
Funding Source


Grant HD26765 from the National Institutes of Health to Keith Rayner

Grant HD065829 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to Roger Levy

A gift from the Microsoft Corporation to Keith Rayner

Atkinson Family Endowment Fund to Keith Rayner

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Award to Keith Rayner

NSF Science of Learning Center Program at Gallaudet University SBE 1041725

Postdoctoral Fellowship (FQRSC 125964) to Nathalie Bélanger

NIDCD Grant R03DC011352 to Nathalie Bélanger

DFG grant FOR868/1 to Michael Dambacher

Chancellor's Research Scholarship to C. Berry

University of California at San Diego Academic Senate Award to R. Levy

Psi Chi Summer Research Grant to R. Tran

Chancellor’s Research Scholarship to R. Tran

Grant PSI2011-26924 from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness

Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)

Predoctoral Fellowship on Training Grant DC000041 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to E. Schotter

Grant HD051030 from the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development to V. Ferreira

Career Award Grant IIS0953870 from the National Science Foundation to R. Levy

NICHD HD050287 awarded to T. Gollan

RES-000-22-3398 from the Economic and Social Research Council to S. Liversedge

World Universities Network award to S. Liversedge

Denis Drieghe as Postdoctoral Fellow of the Fund for Scientific Research

Predoctoral Fellowship on Training Grant DC000041 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to E. Schotter

Grant HD051030 from the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development to V. Ferreira

Career Award Grant IIS0953870 from the National Science Foundation to R. Levy