William Bond Papers, 1768-1883, bulk 1775-1776 (MSS 0080)

Restrictions: Digital surrogates must be used in place of original documents.

Extent: 1.4 Linear feet (1 archives box and 1 flat box)

View OnlineThis collection has been digitized.

Papers of William Bond (d. 1776), Revolutionary Army officer and colonel in the 25th Regiment of Foot from Massachusetts. Bond led the regiment from July 1775 to August 31, 1776, when he died from an illness at Mount Independence near Fort Ticonderoga. The collection is arranged chronologically in a single series containing correspondence, orders, resolutions by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, lists of officers and soldiers, financial receipts, and miscellaneous administrative documents related to the 25th Regiment.

On the basis of materials in this collection, William Bond lived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1768 and was probably the son of Jonas and Hannah Bond. He was a captain in the military in 1774. In July, 1775, he held the rank of lieutenant colonel, second-in-command, in the 37th Regiment of Foot (infantry) in General George Washington's Continental Army. After the death of the regiment's commander, Colonel Thomas Gardner, Bond was promoted to colonel and took over command. After November, 1775, Bond's regiment was renamed the 25th Regiment and remained camped at Prospect Hill, Massachusetts, during the winter of 1775-1776.

William Bond and the 25th Regiment participated in the campaign to conquer Canada during 1776. Congress had requested that General Washington send four regiments to reinforce the army in Canada. On March 15, 1776, the 5th and 25th Regiments received orders from General Horatio Gates to march to Norwich, Connecticut. On March 30, the Massachusetts regiments led by William Bond, John Patterson and John Greaton, along with the New Hampshire regiment led by Enoch Poor, arrived in New York. On April 21, the four regiments sailed in sloops up the Hudson River to Albany under the command of General William Thompson.

In early May, the 25th Regiment was preparing to cross into Canada by boat and reached Sorel by June 14, Chamblee by June 17, Isle aux Noix by June 18, and Crown Point by July 11. On August 10, the 25th Regiment was camped at Mount Independence, a hill near Fort Ticonderoga. The stagnant lakes and swamps around Mount Independence contributed to the diseases already suffered by the regiment, including smallpox. Desertions and discharges for medical reasons severly reduced troop strength. On August 31, 1776, Colonel William Bond died of illness at Mount Independence.

Papers of William Bond (d. 1776), Revolutionary Army officer and colonel in the 25th Regiment of Foot from Massachusetts. Bond led the regiment from July 1775 to August 31, 1776, when he died from an illness at Mount Independence near Fort Ticonderoga.

Significant among the few items of correspondence is an autograph letter signed by General George Washington (20 May 1776) to Major General Sullivan in which he laments the "indolence" of States "so backward in reinforcing you," agrees to allow General Stark to join Sullivan and relates news that the enemy will soon evacuate Philadelphia. Other important correspondence includes four letters from Bond to his wife Lucy in Watertown, Massachusetts (dated 12 April, 20 April, 11 July, and 10 August 1776).

The collection contains numerous administrative documents related to Bond's position as commander of the 25th Regiment, including written orders, resolutions of the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, receipts for supplies, and lists of returns of officers, soldiers, deserters, and discharges. Among the signers of these documents are generals Philip Schuyler (5 May 1776), Horatio Gates (15 March 1776), William Heath (14 August 1775), and Nathanael Greene (15 March 1776). Among the resolutions are two signed by Joseph Warren (24 April and 19 May 1775). Also included is a list of Bond's personal property, which was inventoried and appraised shortly after his death (September 1776).

The collection is arranged chronologically in a single series containing correspondence, orders, resolutions by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, lists of officers and soldiers, financial receipts, and miscellaneous administrative documents related to the 25th Regiment. Materials with approximated dates appear at the end of the collection.

Container List

DOCUMENTS

Box: 1 Folder: 2

10 pages.

Box: 1 Folder: 3

8 pages.

Box: 1 Folder: 4

Printed resolution which established pay rated for officers and enlisted men, provided for uniforms for non-commissioned officers and privates and specified that local towns should provide enlistees with blankets. 1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 7

Resolution proposing officers who report false numbers of men or equipment under their commands be convicted and cashiered. 1 page (two copies).

Box: 1 Folder: 9

Printed resolution regarding the observance of the Sabbath. 1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 10

1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 15

Printed form with signifigant holograph annotations. 1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 19

1 page. See also, "A return of Capt. Abner Craft's Comp. in Coll. Willm. Bond Reg." in Box 2, Folder 5.

Box: 1 Folder: 21

Israel Woodcock was tried for assaulting an officer. 1 page (copy).

Box: 1 Folder: 26

Orders to proceed to Norwich, Connecticut signed by General Horatio Gates. 1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 27

Bond wrote from New York to his wife in Watertown, Mass., regarding the disposition of regiments in the area and mentioned that soon several regiments would be sent to Quebec. 1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 28

1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 29

Bond wrote to his wife from New York that Colonel Poor's, Patterson's, Graton's, and Bond's regiment shall sail for Albany and related that his regiment was in good health. 1 page.

Box: 1 Folder: 30

Gen Schuyler worries that there will not be enough boats to transport his men to Canada quickly and orders Colonels Patterson, Greaton, and Bond to put 30 men per boat with only 9 oars. 1 page.

Box: 2 Folder: 3

1 page.

Oversize. Restrictions Apply.

Box: 1 Folder: 32

Bond wrote to his wife Crown Point about an outbreak of smallpox in his regiment, his movements in Canada and his impending march to Ticonderoga. 2 pages.

Box: 2 Folder: 4

1 page.

Oversize. Restrictions Apply.

Box: 1 Folder: 34

Bond wrote to his wife from Ticonderoga about the numbers of sick men in his regiment, described the camp outside Ticonderoga and the military activities in the area. 2 pages.

Box: 1 Folder: 38

Trumbull has reviewed his copy of General Order of the Army at Ticonderoga and finds nothing that would help established the family's claim (undisclosed). 1 page.

Undated
Box: 1 Folder: 39
Box: 1 Folder: 42
Excerpt. An oration, pronounced at Portland, July 4, 1795: being the birthday of Columbian freedom. By Elijah Kellogg, A.M., 1795

Pages 25-28.

Box: 2 Folder: 5

Oversize. Restrictions Apply.