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Data from: The relations between sleep, time of physical activity, and time outdoors among adult women

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Data from: The relations between sleep, time of physical activity, and time outdoors among adult women

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Date Collected
  • 2012-10-10 to 2014-01-13
Date Issued
  • 2017
Cite This Work

Murray, Kate; Godbole, Suneeta; Natarajan, Loki; Full, Kelsie; Hipp, Aaron; Glanz, Karen; Mitchell, Jonathan; Laden, Francine; James, Peter; Quante, Mirja; Kerr, Jacqueline (2017): Data from: The relations between sleep, time of physical activity, and time outdoors among adult women. UC San Diego Library Digital Collections. https://doi.org/10.6075/J0BZ6478

Description

Physical activity and time spent outdoors may be important non-pharmacological approaches to improve sleep quality and duration (or sleep patterns) but there is little empirical research evaluating the two simultaneously. The current study assesses the role of physical activity and time outdoors in predicting sleep health by using objective measurement of the three variables. A convenience sample of 360 adult women (mean age = 55.38 ±9.89 years; mean body mass index = 27.74 ±6.12) was recruited from different regions of the U.S. Participants wore a Global Positioning System device and ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers on the hip for 7 days and on the wrist for 7 days and 7 nights to assess total time and time of day spent outdoors, total minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day, and 4 measures of sleep health, respectively. A generalized mixed-effects model was used to assess temporal associations between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, outdoor time, and sleep at the daily level (days = 1931) within individuals. There was a significant interaction (p = 0.04) between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and time spent outdoors in predicting total sleep time but not for predicting sleep efficiency. Increasing time outdoors in the afternoon (versus morning) predicted lower sleep efficiency, but had no effect on total sleep time. Time spent outdoors and the time of day spent outdoors may be important moderators in assessing the relation between physical activity and sleep. More research is needed in larger populations using experimental designs.

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1 digital object.

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Note

Questions or comments regarding the data should be directed to Jacqueline Kerr (jkerr@ucsd.edu).

Related Publications

Murray K, Godbole S, Natarajan L, Full K, Hipp JA, Glanz K, et al. (2017) The relations between sleep, time of physical activity, and time outdoors among adult women. PLoS ONE 12(9): e0182013. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182013

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Language
  • English
Funding

This work was supported by: National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/) Centers for Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer grants U01 CA116850, U54 CA155496, U54 CA155626, U54 CA155435, U54 CA155850; National Institutes of Health (https://www.nih.gov/) grants UM1 CA176726 and R01 ES017017; American Cancer Society (http://www.cancer.org/) grant MRSG-13-069-01-CPPB (KM); Harvard National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/) Cardiovascular Epidemiology Training Grant T32 HL 098048 (PJ); Max Kade Foundation (http://maxkadefoundation.org/grants.html) scholarship (MQ); National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/) grant F32CA162847 (JM) and K99CA201542 (PJ). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.