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  1. [The Glomar Challenger Profile]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  2. Ancient Nile River Mud Core - William B.F. Ryan, left, of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, and Kenneth J. Hsu, center of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, show Travis Rayborn, of Global Marine Inc., a core of ancient Nile River abyssal sediment recovered on the Mediterranean Sea Ridge during Leg Thirteen of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Ryan and Hsu were cruise-co-chief scientists, while Rayborn was drilling superintendent for the Glomar Challenger drilling and coring crews. 1970

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Orrin Russie; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Rayborn, Travis; Ryan, William B. F.; Hsü, Kenneth J. (Kenneth Jinghwa), 1929-
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Oceanographers; Drill cores; Sedimentation and deposition--Research--Nile River; Geophysicists; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Scientists
    • Format: image
  3. Demarara Rise Core - A 110-million-year-old limestone core taken from the Demarara Rise off South America during Leg Fourteen of Deep Sea Drilling Project, is being inspected by officials aboard the drilling vessel, Glomar Challenger. Left to right, Cruise Operations Manager Del Redding, of Phillips Petroleum Company, Dennis E. Hayes, of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, and Anthony C. Pimm, of Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Hayes and Pimm were Cruise Co-Chief Scientists on the Lisbon to San Juan, Puerto Rico, expedition.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by George L. Jones; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Pimm, A. C.; Redding, Dell; Hayes, Dennis E.
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Oceanographers; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Geophysicists; Scientists; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  4. Evaporite Core - An evaporite core taken from the Mediterranean Seaduring Leg Thirteen of the Deep Sea Drilling Project is shown in the core liner by Cruise Co-Chief Scientists Drs. Kenneth J. Hsu, left, and Dr. William B.F. Ryan, right. Charles Simon, of the Glomar Challenger drilling crew, is in the middle. An evaporite is a chemical precipitation formed from evaporation of salt or sea water. Dr. Hsu is from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, while Dr. Ryan is from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Orrin Russie; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Simon, Charles; Hsü, Kenneth J. (Kenneth Jinghwa), 1929-; Ryan, William B. F.
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Drill cores; Scientists; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Geophysicists; Submarine geology; Oceanographers
    • Format: image
  5. Kenneth E. Brunot

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Brunot, Kenneth E.
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Engineers--Portraits
    • Format: image
  6. Leg XI Site 105 Core No. 40

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  7. Marine Technicians at Sea - Louise Henry (left), is normally a secretary for the Deep Sea Drilling Project at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. However, she has been to sea twice with the Project - first as a yeoman and later as a marine technicial. Above, Henry holds some Mediterranean Sea core samples encased in plastic liners along with Sue Strain, who also was aboard the drilling vessel, Glomar Challenger, as a yeoman. The 194-foot-tall drilling derrick which is located amidship is in the background. 1970

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Orrin Russie.; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Henry, Marjorie Louise, 1953-1986; Strain, Susan
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Sailors; Women scientists; Women in science; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  8. Middle Jurassic limestone-This 160 million-year-old Middle Jurassic limestone core, oldest ever taken from any ocean of the world was recovered on Leg Eleven of the Deep Sea Drilling Project at a site northeast of the Bahama Islands. Scientists used these sediments in order to interpret the origin and history of the development of the Atlantic Ocean. Holding the historic core on the drill floor of D/V Glomar Challenger are, left to right, Cruise Co-Chief Scientists Dr. Charles D. Hollister, of Woods Hole Ocanographic Institution,&Mr. John I. Ewing, of Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, and Cruise Operations Manager James A. Dawson, of Gulf Oil Company.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Ewing, J. I. (John I.); Dawson, James A.; Hollister, Charles D., 1936-
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Geologists; Drill cores; Oceanographers; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Bahamas
    • Format: image
  9. Middle Jurassic limestone-This 160 million-year-old Middle Jurassic limestone core, oldest ever taken from any ocean of the world was recovered on Leg Eleven of the Deep Sea Drilling Project at a site northeast of the Bahama Islands. Scientists used these sediments in order to interpret the origin and history of the development of the Atlantic Ocean. Holding the historic core on the drill floor of D/V Glomar Challenger are, left to right, Cruise Co-Chief Scientists Dr. Charles D. Hollister, of Woods Hole Ocanographic Institution,&Mr. John I. Ewing, of Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, and Cruise Operations Manager James A. Dawson, of Gulf Oil Company.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Dawson, James A.; Ewing, J. I. (John I.); Hollister, Charles D., 1936-
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Drill cores; Oceanographers; Geologists; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Bahamas
    • Format: image
  10. Miss Drilling Project scientific staff, looks at Radiolaria skeletons in sedimentary material recovered on Leg Fourteen of DSDP. Scientists identify microfossils by paleontology methods to determine age of sediment retrieved from the ocean floor.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Musich, Lillian F.
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Women scientists--Portraits; Women in science--Portraits; Micropaleontology; Microscopes; Marine sediments; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  11. Paula Worstell [on bridge of Glomar Challenger]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Worstell, Paula
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Women scientists; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Women in science
    • Format: image
  12. Secretary at Sea - Sue Strain (right), of El Centro. Is normally a secretary for the Deep Sea Drilling Project at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. However, she went to sea on Leg Thirteen as secretary to the cruise co-chief scientists. Above, Strain holds some Mediterranean Sea core samples encased in plastic liners along with Louise Henry, who also was aboard the drilling vessel Glomar Challenger as a technician. The 194-foot-tall drilling derrick which is located amidships can be seen in the background. 1970

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Orrin Russie; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Henry, Louise (Marjorie Louise), 1930-1989; Strain, Sue
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Women in science; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Laboratory technicians; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  13. Texaco Officials Visit Challenger

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Galloway, R. L.; Woodward, D.; Ziober, J. J.; Westmoreland, J. W.; Mott, G. E.; Sleeper, J. L., Jr.; Hobson, J. S.; Wallace, W. F.; Hubbs, L. N.; Matthews, C. C.; McLennen, L.; McDaniel, A. R.; Fountaine, M. F.; DeRudder, R. D.; Allinder, W. F.; Felts, W. M.
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Petroleum industry and trade--United States; Petroleum geologists; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Texaco, Inc.
    • Format: image
  14. Ground Breaking at S.I.O. - With an earth-moving machine in the background waiting to go to work, Dr. M.N.A. Peterson, right, and Mr. A.R. McLerran, break ground for an additional Deep Sea Drilling Project building at Scripps Institutioin of Oceanography. Dr. Peterson is Principal Investigator and Project Manager of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, while Mr. McLerran is the National Science Foundatin Field Project Officer for DSDP. The new building, located East of the original Project building on La Jolla Shores Drive, will be a partial two-storey structure with the entire lower floor designed for core storage and handling. Laboratories and office space will be located on the second floor. The new structure will cost an estimated $260,000.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Photo by Larry Ford; Brunot, Kenneth E.; McLerran, Arch R.; Nierenberg, William A. (William Aaron), 1919-; Peterson, Melvin N. A.
    • Date: 1970-03-09
    • Topic: Scripps Institution of Oceanography--Buildings; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  15. Microscopic Study of Fossils - Paula Worstell, a member of the scientific staff for Leg Eleven of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, looks at some Foraminifera fossils through a microscope in the Scientific Laboratory aboard the drilling research vessel Glomar Challenger. April 1970

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Worstell, Paula
    • Date: 1970-04
    • Topic: Women scientists--Portraits; Scientists--Portraits; Women in science; Microscopes; Geologists--Portraits; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  16. Aerial Photograph - Scripps Institution of Oceanography [Construction of Deep Sea Drilling Building]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Photo by Larry Ford
    • Date: 1970-04-02
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Scripps Institution of Oceanography--Buildings; Scripps Institution of Oceanography--Cottages
    • Format: image
  17. Deep Ocean Drill Bits-Deep Sea Drilling Project Operations Manager Valdemar F. (Swede) Larson inspecs some of the various types of core bits carried aboard D/V Glomar challenger. Bits on the left have roller cutters, while those on the right utilize industrial diamonds. The first two bits on the left have tungsten carbide inserts and were developed specifically for DSDP to improve penetration of hard chert layers. Extensive use of these bits began on Leg 11 and it was their use which was instrumental in recovery of the oldest sediment - Middle Jurassic 150 to 160 milliion years old. Two bits in the middle are the best performers in stiff clays or gumbo and saw extensive use in the Gulf of Mexico on Legs 1 and 10. Bits on right have proved excellent recoveries in the deep ocean oozes when extensive chert beds are missing. Development of better core bits has been a continuing joint effort between drilling industry and project personnel headed by Operations Manager Larson

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Larson, Valdemar F.
    • Date: 1970-06
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Bits (Drilling and boring); Drilling and boring machinery; Engineers--Portraits
    • Format: image
  18. Deep Sea Explorer - This is a stern, starboard view of the Deep Sea Drilling Project drilling vessel, Glomar Challenger, which is drilling and coring for ocean seeiment in all the oceans of the world. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for DSDP under a $34.8 million contract with the National Science Foundation. The drilling vessel is owned and operated by Global Marine Inc., of Los Angeles, which holds a subcontract with Scripps to do actual drilling and coring work. The Glomar Challenger weighs 10,400 tons, is 400 feet long and the million-point hoot-load capacity drilling derrick stands 194 feet above the waterline. She is the first of a new generation of heavy drilling ships capable of conducting drilling operations in open ocean, using dynamic positioning to maintain postiion over the bore-hole. A re-entry capability was established on June 14, 1970, which will enable the changing of drill bits and re-entering the same bore-hole in the dee ocean. Forward is the automatic pipe racker, designed by Global Mairne Inc., which holds 24,000 feet of 5-inch pipe.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by T.J. Wiley, Jr.; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1970-06
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  19. Entering Bethlehem Steel's Hoboken, N.J., Shipyard is the Glomar Challenger, unique deep sea drilling ship which recently brought up the oldest sediments yet recovered from the world's ocean basins -- Middle Jurassic limestone 160 million years old. The cores were recovered in the Atlantic in waters three miles deep, and they will be used to interpret the formation and early history of that ocean. This ocean-bottom coring, known official as the Deep Sea Drilling Project, is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and is under the management of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San diego. Scientists who participated in this historic phase of the proejct described their findings at a news conference in New York city today (June 1). While at the Bethlehem Hoboken Yard the Glomar Challenger will take on additional supplies for the next portion of the project. Owned by Global Marine, Inc., the twin-screw, diesel-engined craft has a length of 400 feet, beam of 65 feet, and draft of 20 feet. Her derrick top is 194 feet above water level

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1970-06-01
    • Topic: Shipyards--United States; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  20. Smiles of Success-Four Deep Sea Drilling Project key officials are holding the first sediment core ever recovered through the re-entry procedure. Left to right, Operations Manager Valdemar F. Larson; A.R. McLerran, National Science Foundation Field Operations Officer; Project Engineer Darrell L. Sims; and Project Manager Kenneth E. Brunot. Re-Entry was achieved and the first core recovered off New York in June of 1970 in 10,000 feet of water

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Sims, Darrell L.; McLerran, Arch R.; Brunot, Kenneth E.; Larson, Valdemar F.
    • Date: 1970-06
    • Topic: Drilling and boring; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  21. First re-entry core crew - It was a historic occasion early in the morning on Monday, June 15, 1970, when the first re-entry procedure core was hoisted on the drilling floor of D/V Glomar Challenger. Engineers, drilling crew members and scientists hold pieces of the gray, hemipelagic sediment. Back row, left to right, Leon Blurton, Global Marine Inc. Project Officer for re-entry; Kenneth E. Brunot, DSDP Project Manager; and V.F. (Swede) Larson, DSDP Operations Manager. Second row, A.C. Wheeler, Max Stillwell, Dan Womack, Travis Rayburn and Homer Smith, of the drilling crew. Rayburn was drilling superintendent. Front row, Dr. Terry Edgar, DSDP Coordinating Staff Geologist, DSDP Chief Scientist Melvin N.A. Peterson, Charles Simon and Art Bedwell, of the drilling crew.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Stillwell, Max; Blurton, Leon; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-; Larson, Valdemar F.; Brunot, Kenneth E.; Wheeler, A.C.; Smith, Homer; Womack, Dan W.; Rayburn, Travis
    • Date: 1970-06-12
    • Topic: Drill cores; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  22. Re-Entry Trophy-Deep Sea Drilling Project officials and drillers are shown with the first core taken with the re-entry capability on June 14, 1970. The picture was taken on the automatic pipe-racker aboard D/ V Glomar Challenger. First row, left to right, James A. Ruddell, Dan W. Womack, Homer Smith, Charles b. Simons, Waylong F. Brown, A.C. Wheeler, Jr., and Carl Pascuzzo. Second row, Sam Dooley, David Billington, Max Stillwell, Art Bedwell, John Cole and Leon C. Blurton, who was Global Marine Inc. Project Officer for re-entry. Last row, Project Engineer Darrell L. Simms, of DSDP; A.R. McLerran, of the National Science Foundation, Captain Joe Clarke, of the Glomar Challenger; Travel Rayburn, Drilling superintendent, and V.F. (Swede) Larson; Operations Manager for DSDP. Larson and Sims co-directed re-entry trials for the Deep sea Drilling Project

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Simons, Charles B.; Sims, Darrell L.; Pascuzzo, Carl; Womack, Dan W.; Ruddell, James A.; McLerran, Arch R.; Brunot, Kenneth E.; Smith, Homer; Brown, Waylon F.; Larson, Valdemar F.; Wheeler, A.C., Jr.
    • Date: 1970-06-14
    • Topic: Drill cores; Drilling and boring; Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  23. First Re-Entry Core Crew - It was a historic occasion early in the morning on Monday, June 15, 1970, when the first re-entry procedure core was hoisted on the drilling floor of D/V Glomar Challenger. Engineers, drilling crew members and scientists hold pieces of the gray, hemipelagic sediment. Back row, left to right, Leon Blurton, Global Marine Inc Project Officer for re-entry; Benneth E. Brunot, SSDSP Project Manager, and V.F. (Swede) Larson, DSDP Operations Manager. Second row, A.C. Wheeler, Max Stillwell, Dan Womack, Travis Rayburn and Homer Smith of the drilling crew. Rayburn was drilling superintendent. Front row, Dr. Terry Edgar, DSDP Coordinating Staff Geologist, DSDP Chief Scientist Dr. M.N.A. Peterson, Charles Simon and Art Bedwell of the drilling crew

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Womack, Dan W.; Brunot, Kenneth E.; Rayburn, Travis; Wheeler, A. C.; Sims, Darrell L; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-; Larson, Valdemar F.; Blurton, Leon
    • Date: 1970-06-15
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Drilling and boring; Oceanographic research ships; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  24. Deep Sea Explorer - This is a starboard view of the Deep Sea Drilling Project drilling vessel, Glomar Challenger, which is drilling and coring for ocean sediment in all the oceans of the world. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for DSDP under a $34.8 million contract with the National Science Foundation. The drilling vessel is owned and operated by Global Marine, Inc., of Los Angeles, which holds a subcontract with Scripps to do actual drilling and coring work. The Glomar Challenger weighs 10,400 tons, is 400 feet long and the million-poind hoot-load capacity drilling derrick stands 194 feet above the waterline. She is the first of a new generation of heavy drilling ships capable of conducting drilling operations in open ocean, using dynamic positioning to maintain postiion over the bore-hole. A re-entry capability was established on June 14, 1970, which will enable the changing of drill bits and re-entering the same bore-hole in the deep ocean. Forward is the automatic pipe racker, designed by Global Marine, Inc. which holds 24,000 feet of 5-inch drill pipe.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Larry Lauve; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1970-06-17
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  25. Roy E. Anderson, Cruise Operations Manager

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Anderson, Roy E.
    • Date: 1970-08-02
    • Topic: Engineers--Portraits; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  26. Token of Appreciation - Ann Gallie, of Toronto, received a picture of the Deep Sea Drilling Project research vessel Glomar Challenger from Terry Edgar, Coordinating Staff Geologist, upon completion of summer work analyzing geophysical data at DSDP. Presentation took place on the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier. August 27, 1970

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Larry Lauve; Gallie, Ann; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-
    • Date: 1970-08-27
    • Topic: Women scientists; Geophysicists; Geologists; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Women in science
    • Format: image
  27. Caribbean Sea Drilling Sites - Twelve drilling sites were proposed in the Caribbean Sea for Leg Fifteen of the Deep Sea Drilling Project which is being conducted by Scripps Institution of Oceanography. N. Terence Edgar, of Scripps, and John B. Saunders, of Texaco Trinidad Inc., cruise co-chief scientists for the expedition, plan to drill sites in the Venezuela and Columbia Basins utilizing a new technology (re-entry) that permits, in up to 15,000 feet of water, the engineers to pull up the drill string, replace a worn out bit and put the pipe back in the same hole on the ocean floor. Three sites - No. 3 in the Cariaco Trench, No. 5 on the Aves Swell, and No. 8 in the Venezuela Basin - will be drilled primarily to investigate the chemical properties of the cores and the water contained within the sediment. The interstitial or pore waters are instrumental in the formation of minerals and changes in sediment character after burial under the ocean floor. Cruise Operations Manager for the expedition will be Roy E. Anderson, of ESSO Exploration Inc., New York City. 14 October 1970

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1970-10-14
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Marine sediments; Submarine geology
    • Format: image
  28. [Crew aboard Glomar Challenger]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1970-12
    • Topic: Oceanographers; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  29. Ancient Caribbean Rocks-Ancient sediment rocks found deep beneath the Caribbean Sea are examined by Norman Terence Edgar of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (left) and John B. Saunders of Texaco Trinidad Inc. (right). Both were cruise co-chief scientists aboard the Deep Sea Drilling Project Glomar Challenger during a recent cruise in the Caribbean Sea when these samples were collected. Fossils in the sediments tell geologists that the Caribbean Sea is a relatively young feature in the earth's surface. 1971

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Saunders, John B.; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographers; Marine sediments; Geology--Caribbean Sea; Submarine geology
    • Format: image
  30. ANCIENT PACIFIC CORES - Edward L. Winterer, right, Chairman of The Graduate Department at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, points out ancient rock specimens recovered from deep beneath the floor of the Pacific Ocean on Leg Seventeen of the Deep Sea Drilling Project to John I. Ewing, center, and Ed Maxwell, left. Winterer and Ewing, a Senior Research Associate at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, were Cruise Co-Chief Scientists on the 52-day Pacific expedition. Maxwell, on loan to DSDP from Sun Oil Company was Cruise Operations Manager. 1971

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Maxwell, Ed; Ewing, J. I. (John I.); Winterer, Edward L.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Drill core analysis; Submarine geology; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographers; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  31. BUMPER SUB INSPECTION - Bruce C. Heezen, right, of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, and Ian D. MacGregor, center, of the University of California at Davis, Cruise Co-Chief Scientists on Leg 20 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, discuss with Cruise Operations Manager Lamar P. Hayes the function of a bumper sub aboard D/V Glomar Challenger. Normally, three bumper subs each with a five-foot stroke - are used on a drilling string which permits the bottom hole assembly and drill bit to remain at the bottom of the bore-hole by compensating for the heave of the vessel while in the process of drilling and recovering sedientary core material. 1971

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); MacGregor, Ian D.; Heezen, Bruce C.; Hayes, Lamar P.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Boring; Geophysicists; Boring machinery; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographers
    • Format: image
  32. D/V Glomar Challenger - This starboard side view of the Deep Sea Drilling Project's drilling research vessel, Glomar Challenger, was taken in the Atlantic Ocean. The 10,500 ton vessel is 400 feet long, has a beam of 65 feet and a loaded draft of 20 feet. She is a new generation of drilling ships owned by Global Marine, Inc., of Los Angeles, California capable of conducting drilling operations in the open sea using dynamic positioning to maintain position over a bore hole. Visible amidships is the drilling derrick which stands 194 feet above the waterline. Below, not visible, is the 20 X 22 foot center well in which is mounted the guide shoot and through which the bit, drill pipe and other tools are lowered during drilling operations. Forward of the derrick is the Global Marine-designed automatic pipe racker (partially visible) containing 24,000 feet of 5-inch drill pipe. D/V Glomar Challenger is the drilling vessel for the Deep Sea Drilling Project which is managed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, under a contract with the National Science Foundation

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  33. DEEP SEA BASALT-Cruise Co-Chief Scientists Drs. Tjeerd H. van Andel, center, and G. Ross Heath, right, both from Oregon State University, examine a section of late Cretaceous basalt recovered at Site 163 - 600 miles Southeast of Hawaii - on Leg Sixteeen of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Cruise Operations Manager Dell Redding, of Phillips Petroleum Company, left, stands infront of a new three-cone "button bit" and a similar bit which was completely worn out after drilling through 164 feet of cherty sediments and 25 feet of basalt. Water depth at the site was 17,455 feet. Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for the Deep Sea Drilling Project under contract to the National Science Foundation

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Redding, Dell; Van Andel, Tjeerd H. (Tjeerd Hendrik), 1923-; Heath, G. Ross (George Ross), 1939-
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Marine sediments; Bits (Drilling and boring); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Submarine geology; Oceanographers
    • Format: image
  34. Deep Sea Explorer. This is a port side view of the Deep Sea Drilling Project drilling vessel, Glomar Challenger, which is drilling and coring for ocean sediment in all the oceans of the world. Scrips Institution of Oceanography, of the University of california at San Diego, is managing institution for DSDP under a $34.8 million contract with the National Science Foundation. The drilling vessel is owned and operated by Global Marine, Inc., of Los Angeles, which holds a subcontract with Scripps to do actual drilling and coring work. The Glomar Challenger weighs 10,400 tons, is 400 feet long and the million-pound hook-load capacity drilling derrick stands 194 feet above the water line. She is the first of a new generation of heavy drilling ships capable of conducting drilling oerations in open ocean, using dynamic positioning to maintain position over the bore-hole. A re-entry capability was established on June 14, 1970, which will enable the changing of drill bits and re-entering the same bore-hole in the deep ocean. Forward is the automatic pipe racker, designed by Global Marine Inc., which holds 24,000 feet of 5-inch drill pipe.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  35. Dr. T.N. Edgar, Chief Scientist, Deep Sea Drilling Project

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Scientists--Portraits; Geologists--Portraits
    • Format: image
  36. Dr. Thomas W. Donnelly, left and Dr. William Hay, right [on Glomar Challenger]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Hay, William Winn, 1934-; Donnelly, Thomas W.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Oceanographers; Geologists; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  37. DRILL BIT FOR PACIFIC SITES-A three-cone roller core bit made with tungsten carbide inserts and standard rock bit components which will be used in deep Pacific Ocean sediment on Leg 17 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project is being inspected by three men who will be on the expedition, and Dr. N. Terence Edgar, Chief Scientist for DSDP. Left to right, Dr. Edward L. Winterer, of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Dr. Edgar, Mr. Ed Maxwell of Sun Oil Company, and Mr. John I. Ewing, of Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Dr. Winterer and Mr. Ewing will be Cruise Co-Chief Scientists on the expedition which will leave Honolulu on April 1. Mr. Maxwell will be Cruise Operations Manager.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Larry Lauve; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Maxwell, Ed; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-; Winterer, Edward L.; Ewing, J. I. (John I.)
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Oceanographers; Bits (Drilling and boring); Submarine geology; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  38. Isabella P. Silva, a member of the Ocean Paleoenvironment Panel for the international Deep Sea Drilling project, shown here in the paleo lab doing some research work aboard the research ship D/V Glomar Challenger. Circa 1971.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Silva, Isabella P.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Women in science; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographers--Portraits; Paleoceanography; Women scientists
    • Format: image
  39. John B. Saunders (left) and scientist N. Terence Edgar (right) are shown here examining a core sample on the deck of the research ship D/V Glomar Challenger during the international deep sea drilling project. Circa 1971.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Saunders, John B.; Edgar, Norman Terence, 1933-
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Drill cores; Oceanographers--Portraits
    • Format: image
  40. Queensland Plateau Core - Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 21 cruise co-chief scientists Dr. James E. Andrews, right, of the Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, and Dr. Robert E. burns, center of the Joint Oceanographic Research Group, University of Washington (Seattle), join Cruise Operations Manager Theodore C. (Ted) Bangs, of the Union Oil Company, Sante Fe Springs, California, whi is on loan to DSDP, to inspect a sedimentary core ofdeep sea ooze taken at site 209 on the Queensland Plateau, which is located Northeast of Australia. Water depth at the site was 4,593 feet. A portion of the drilling derrick aboard D/V Glomar Challenger is in the background. Scientists and drillers recovered 4,556 feet of core material during leg 21 which was from Suva, Fiji to Darwin, Alaska. Photo by Orrin Russie

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Burns, Robert E.; Bangs, Theodore C.; Andrews, James E.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Drilling and boring machinery; Oceanographers; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  41. QUEENSLND PLATEAU CORE-Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 21 Cruise Co-Chief Scientists Dr. James E. Andrews, right of the Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, and Dr. Robert E. Burns, center of the Joint Oceanographic Research Group, University of Washington (Seattle), join Cruise Operrations Manager Theodore C. (Ted) Bangs, of the Union Oil Commpany, Santa Fe Springs, California, who is on loan to DSDP, to inspect a sedimentary core of deep sea ooze taken at Site 209 on the Queensland Plateau which is located Northeast of Australia. Water depth at the site was 4,593 feet. A portion of the drilling derrick aboard D/V Glomar Challenger is in the background. Scientists and drillers recovered 4,556 feet of core material during leg 21 which was from Suva, Fiji to Darwin, Australia.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Orrin Russie; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Andrews, J. E. (James Einar), 1942-; Bangs, Theodore C.; Burns, Robert E.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Oceanographers; Boring machinery; Drill cores; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Geophysicists
    • Format: image
  42. Scientists Thomas W. Connelly (center left) and Wallace Broecker (center right) working in the core laboratory aboard the D/V Glomar Challenger (ship) during one of the legs of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. February 1971.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Donnelly, Thomas W.; Broecker, Wallace S.
    • Date: 1971-02
    • Topic: Submarine Geology; Scientific Equipment; Marine sediments; Scientific Expeditions
    • Format: image
  43. Scientists Thomas W. Connelly (left) and Wallace Broecker (right) working in one of the laboratories aboard the D/V Glomar Challenger (ship), they are working to describe some cores taken during the Deep Sea Drilling Project. February 1971.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Broecker, Wallace S.; Donnelly, Thomas W.
    • Date: 1971-02
    • Topic: Marine sediments; Core Drilling; Drilling and boring; Scientific Expeditions; Submarine Geology
    • Format: image
  44. Seismic Profile Watch - Trudy Christine Wood, a paleontological preparation technician for Deep Sea Drilling Project at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Trudy stands underway watch aboard D/V Glomar Challenger at the seismic profile recorder in the vessel's electronicsl laboratory. She is adjusting the seismic profiles and recording readings. 1971

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Larry Lauve; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Wood, Trudy
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Women in science; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Seismic profiling; Oceanographic instruments
    • Format: image
  45. Thomas W. Donnelly a noted geologist using a microscope aboard the research ship D/V Glomar Challenger during the international deep sea drilling project. Circa 1971.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Donnelly, Thomas W.
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Geologists--Portraits; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Scientists--Portraits
    • Format: image
  46. Unidentified man using and working the state of the art computer for its time aboard the research ship D/V Glomar Challenger during the international deep sea drilling project. Circa 1971.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Scientists--Portraits; Computers; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  47. [Coast Guard icebreaker BURTON ISLAND (WAGB-283) seen from deck of D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Victor S. Soleto; Burton Island (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Ice-breaking vessels--United States; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Helicopters; United States. Coast Guard--Ice breaking operations
    • Format: image
  48. [Coast Guard icebreaker BURTON ISLAND (WAGB-283) seen from deck of D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Victor S. Soleto; Burton Island (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Ice-breaking vessels--United States; United States. Coast Guard--Ice breaking operations; Icebergs; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  49. [Drilling rig on deck of D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Cranes, derricks, etc.; Drilling and boring machinery; Tower cranes; Ice; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image