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  1. [D/V Glomar Challenger in port, circa 1968]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Harbors; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  2. [D/V Glomar Challenger] Rig Floor Shots, Core Lab Aft door, View of rig floor

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Boring; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  3. [D/V Glomar Challenger] Rig Floor Shots, see "Logging cab Consule" View from inside logging cab to rig floor

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Drilling and boring
    • Format: image
  4. [Drawing of Glomar Challenger]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Drawing by Chris v.d. Borch; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  5. [Forward deck of Glomar Challenger]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  6. [Glomar Challenger at Sea]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  7. [Glomar Challenger Launch]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Gunn's Studio, Orange, Texas; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  8. [Glomar Challenger Launch]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Gunn's Studio, Orange, Texas; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  9. [Ice on cleat on D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships; Ice; Sea ice
    • Format: image
  10. [Ice on deck of D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Sea ice; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Ice; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  11. [Iceberg seen from deck of D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Icebergs; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Antarctica
    • Format: image
  12. [Man in parka on icy deck of D/V Glomar Challenger] Antarctica, Leg 28

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Ice
    • Format: image
  13. [Man on bridge of Glomar Challenger]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  14. [Man with instrument in D/V Glomar Challenger laboratory]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Reid, Joseph L.; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1982
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Laboratories; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  15. [Profile, Glomar Challenger, cMarch 23, 1968]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Global Marine, Inc.; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  16. [The Glomar Challenger Profile]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1970
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  17. Chem Lab D/V Glomar Challenger. Tech[nician] Bill Myer titrations

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Myer, William
    • Date: 1983-07
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Chemical oceanography; Laboratories; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships; Chemists
    • Format: image
  18. Close-up of forward radar - This is a close-up view of the forward radar (surface) mounted on a mast in the bow section of D/V Glomar Challenger during modification work between Legs 25 and 26 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. The 194-foot tall drilling derrick is at the left.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships; Radar--Installation on Ships
    • Format: image
  19. D/V Glomar Challenger (ship) during it's construction in the Levingston Shipyard, Orange, Texas. Circa 1968.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  20. D/V Glomar Challenger - This starboard side view of the Deep Sea Drilling Project's drilling research vessel, Glomar Challenger, was taken in the Atlantic Ocean. The 10,500 ton vessel is 400 feet long, has a beam of 65 feet and a loaded draft of 20 feet. She is a new generation of drilling ships owned by Global Marine, Inc., of Los Angeles, California capable of conducting drilling operations in the open sea using dynamic positioning to maintain position over a bore hole. Visible amidships is the drilling derrick which stands 194 feet above the waterline. Below, not visible, is the 20 X 22 foot center well in which is mounted the guide shoot and through which the bit, drill pipe and other tools are lowered during drilling operations. Forward of the derrick is the Global Marine-designed automatic pipe racker (partially visible) containing 24,000 feet of 5-inch drill pipe. D/V Glomar Challenger is the drilling vessel for the Deep Sea Drilling Project which is managed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, under a contract with the National Science Foundation

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1971
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  21. D/V Glomar Challenger [at dock, illuminated]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  22. D/V Glomar Challenger in the open sea

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  23. D/V Glomar Challenger, Photo by Victor S. Sotelo, DSDP Leg 85

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Victor S. Sotelo; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1982
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  24. D/V Glomar Challenger, San Diego

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Coronado (Calif.); Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  25. Deep Sea Explorer - This is a stern, starboard view of the Deep Sea Drilling Project drilling vessel, Glomar Challenger, which is drilling and coring for ocean seeiment in all the oceans of the world. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for DSDP under a $34.8 million contract with the National Science Foundation. The drilling vessel is owned and operated by Global Marine Inc., of Los Angeles, which holds a subcontract with Scripps to do actual drilling and coring work. The Glomar Challenger weighs 10,400 tons, is 400 feet long and the million-point hoot-load capacity drilling derrick stands 194 feet above the waterline. She is the first of a new generation of heavy drilling ships capable of conducting drilling operations in open ocean, using dynamic positioning to maintain postiion over the bore-hole. A re-entry capability was established on June 14, 1970, which will enable the changing of drill bits and re-entering the same bore-hole in the dee ocean. Forward is the automatic pipe racker, designed by Global Mairne Inc., which holds 24,000 feet of 5-inch pipe.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by T.J. Wiley, Jr.; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1970-06
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  26. Drydock in Hoboken - The Deep Sea Drilling Project drilling ship, Glomar Challenger, is shown in drydock at the Bethlehem Steel Company Shipbuilding Yards in Hoboken, New Jersey. The New York skyline shows in the background.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Shipyards--United States; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  27. Dynamic Positioning and Re-Entry. Schematic diagram showing general arrangements allowing positioning of the drilling vessel in deep water and technique of drill hole re-entry. The re-entry cone, on the sea floor, is 16 ft. in diameter and is mounted on steel casing in the upper part of the borehole, where it is inserted as the initial borehole is started. When the casing and core are fully in place, the assembly is detached from the drill string and the hole is drilled deeper. To change a bit, for example, the drill string is recovered to the ship, the bit is changed, and then again lowered to just above the cone. The vessel is moved as necessary to position the bit directly above the cone, as seen by side scanning sonar, at which time re-entry is made by lowering the pipe.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: L.W. Walsh; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1973
    • Topic: Ships--Dynamic positioning systems; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  28. Dynamic Positioning-Re-entry Consoles. Senior Scientist Oscar E. Weser, of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, handles the manual control levers of the dynamic positioning system aboard D/V Glomar Challenger. The bridge photograph also shows the dynamic positioning console (center) and the re-entry console on the right. Both are used during actual re-entry of a bore hole on the ocean floor

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Weser,Oscar E.
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships; Ships--Dynamic positioning systems; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  29. Glomar Challenger Built for Global Marine, Inc. Levingston Shipbuilding Company

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  30. Glomar Challenger Demob

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  31. Glomar Challenger dock-side, Manzanillo, Mexico, May 1979, Leg 67, Victor S. Solelo

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project, Photo by Victor S. Sotelo; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1979-05
    • Topic: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  32. Glomar Challenger during construction, Levingston Shipyard, Orange, Texas

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Shipyards--United States; Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  33. Glomar Challenger Launch

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Gunn's Studio, Orange, Texas; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  34. Glomar Challenger Science Lab

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1983-04
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Laboratories; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  35. Glomar Challenger. Deep Sea Drilling Project.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1980
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  36. Ground-Level Bow View - This is a ground-level, head-on bow shot of D/V Glomar Challenger while in drydock before beginning Leg 26 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Shown on the bow is the new lookout station to protect seamen from the environments while engaged in the proposed Antarctic voyages. In addition, the newly installed support for a forward radar can be seen on the forecastle mast. The radar was installed to improve navigation during eh Antarctic work proposed for the next three austral summers. The Deep Sea Drilling Project is managed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California, San Diego under contract to the National Science Foundation

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Harbors--South Africa--Durban; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  37. Initial Drill for Re-Entry - This 14 7/8 inch four roller cone tungsten carbide insert roller bit is used to drill the initial hole after the re-entry cone has been landed on the ocean bottom. It is used to run the 16-inch casing which is hung below the cone. Then comes the 11 3/4-inch casing necessary to prevent deep penetration holes from filling up with debris. A similar 10-inches in diameter is used to drill the remainder of the hole.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1975
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Bits (Drilling and boring); Drilling and boring; Drill cores; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  38. Motion Instrumentation Control - One of the many modifications made on D/V Glomar Challenger while in drydock before starting Leg 26 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project was the installation of a new vessel motion instrumentation control on the bridge. The dynamic postioning automatic controls are shown at left.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1972
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Ships--Dynamic positioning systems; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  39. New Satellite weather Antenna-Principal Electronics Technician David Havens turns the wheel which adjusts vertical angle on the new satellite weather antenna installed aboard D/V Glomar Challenger during the port call at Agana, Guam, between legs 59 and 60 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. The big wheel at the bottom takes care of the horizonal and vertical antenna angles. Information is received from a satellite in stationary orbit and processed by shipboard equipment to produce a weather map which enables the captain, scientists and operations personnel to get weather forecasets 18 hours in advance at any drilling and core site.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project; Havens, David
    • Date: 1978
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Antennas; Satellite meteorology; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  40. Smiles of Success-Four Deep Sea Drilling Project key officials are holding the first sediment core ever recovered through the re-entry procedure. Left to right, Operations Manager Valdemar F. Larson; A.R. McLerran, National Science Foundation Field Operations Officer; Project Engineer Darrell L. Sims; and Project Manager Kenneth E. Brunot. Re-Entry was achieved and the first core recovered off New York in June of 1970 in 10,000 feet of water

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Sims, Darrell L.; McLerran, Arch R.; Brunot, Kenneth E.; Larson, Valdemar F.
    • Date: 1970-06
    • Topic: Drilling and boring; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Drill cores
    • Format: image
  41. Stroked Out Position-The Heave Compensator aboard D/V Glomar challenger is shown in a partially stoked out position. The lower lifting block and piston rod supports the full weight of th drill string and the upper cylinder portion is linked to the traveling block. The system is designed to improve core and extend bit life by eliminating the movement and bottom pounding of the drill string due to vessel heave. This is accomplished by maintaining a constand hydraulic supporting under the piston as the compensating cylinder heaves with the vessel. Maximum working load is 600,000 pounds and maximum heave compensated 15 feet. Load variation at 400,000 pounds (plus or minus) 2,500 pounds.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Topic: Ships--Dynamic positioning systems; Drilling and boring; Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  42. The research ship D/V Glomar Challenger used for the Deep Sea Drilling Project at sea. Circa 1968.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image
  43. View of 57-inch bow thruster tunnels of Glomar Challenger just prior to launch on 23 March [1968] at Levingston Shipbuilding Company, Orange, Texas. A similar pair of thrusters is located in skeg in stern of vessel. The 10,500-ton, 400-foot self-propelled drilling vessel, designed by Global Marine, Inc., will be used in the Deep-Sea Drilling Project in which cores of ocean bottom sediments will be recovered in water depths of up to 20,000 feet in Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The project, funded by National Science Foundation, is managed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Drilling operations are to commence in June of this year.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Global Marine, Inc.; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  44. View of stern thrusters in skeg of Global Marine Inc.'s Glomar Challenger while on ways just before the launch 23 March [1968] in yards of Livingston Shipbuilding Co., Orange, Texas. Thruster tunnels are 57 inches in diameter. Starboard screw also is visible in photo. Similar pair of thrusters is located in bow of vessel. Computer-controlled thrusters will hold ship on station during drilling of core holes in up to 20,000 feet of water in Atlantic and Pacific Oceans during Deep-Sea Drilling Project. The Global Marine-designed ship has a length of 400 feet, beam of 65 feet, and displacement of 10,500 tons.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Global Marine, Inc.; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1968-03-23
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  45. [D/V Glomar Challenger] Bridge

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship); Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Date: 1968
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Deep-sea drilling ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  46. [D/V Glomar Challenger] Rig Floor Shots

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Topic: Deep-sea drilling ships; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Drilling and boring
    • Format: image
  47. [D/V Glomar Challenger] Rig Floor Shots

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Glomar Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1983
    • Topic: Boring; Oceanographic research ships; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Deep-sea drilling ships
    • Format: image