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Showing results for 1 - 13 of 13 Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876

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  1. Joseph Matkin Portrait

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Challenger (Ship); Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Matkin, Josep, 1853-1927
    • Topic: Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876--Photographs; Sailors--Portraits; Men--Portraits
    • Format: image
  2. Old and New Challengers - Models of H.M.S. Challenger and D/V Glomar Challenger are shown with the tracks of Phase I of the Deep Sea Drilling project in the background. For propulsion, H.M.S. Challenger relied on her sails and suxilliary steam power of 1,234 horsepower. D/V Glomar Challenger can produce 8,800 continuous or 10,000 intermittent horsepower for propulsion and to operate the drilling equipment. Where H.M.S. Challenger shortened sails and used steam power to remain over a site, D/V Glomar Challenger has dynamic positioning. The first Challenger was 200 feet long and displaced 2,306 tons. Glomar Challenger is 400 feet long and displaces 10,500 tons. The scientific impact of both vessels has been revolutionary. While H.M.S. Challenger is generally thought of as beginning the science of deep ocean marine geology, the results of D/V Glomar Challenger's drilling and coring have truly revolutionized science.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Topic: Ship Models; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Deep Sea Drilling Project
    • Format: image
  3. [H.M.S. Challenger Dredge operations]

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: DeepSea Drilling Project; Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Dredges; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876
    • Format: image
  4. H.M.S. Challenger Dredging and Sounding Equipment-Shown on the decks of H.M.S. Challenger is the dredging and sounding equipment used by the Royal Society in the first charting of the map of the world under the seas. The equipment included instruments for taking soundings, bottom samples and undersea temperatures; winches and a donkey engine; 144 miles of sounding wire; sinkers, nets and dredges. The Royal Navy crew held H.M.S. challenger steady at each site with her steam engines, enabling scientists to take a standard series of observations which included the total depth of water, the temperature at various depths, the atmospheric and meteorological conditions, the direction and rate of the current on the ocean surface and occasionally of the currents at different depths. All soundings and sampling from depths were hoisted by the 18-horsepower donkey steam engine, using the main yard arm as a boom over the side. Sounding to determine depths was carried out in shallow water under 1,000 fathoms with a light conventional lead which had a small compartment for obtaining a bottom sample. For greater depths, a different device was developed which had detachable weights of 300 pounds. This was the forerunner of the modern corer which took a sample of the bottom in a tube.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  5. H.M.S. Challenger, as fitted for a voyage of Deep sea exploration, December 1872, Lower Deck, Hold

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Oceanographic research ships; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876
    • Format: image
  6. H.M.S. Challenger, as fitted for a voyage of Deep sea exploration, December 1872, Upper Deck, Main Deck

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Oceanographic research ships
    • Format: image
  7. HMS Challenger and exploration track. In 1872, the British Navy made available to the Royal Society a 2,306-ton full-rigged corvelle, the HMS Challenger for a 3-1/2 year study of the oceans of the world. She was fitted with 1,234 horsepower of auxiliary steam power in addition to her sails. As the world's first oceanograph research vessel, she sailed 8,890 miles in 3-1/2 years, doing research in all oceans except the Arctic. She was 200 ft. long, had a beam of 38 ft., and her speed was 10 knots maximum on best day

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: Deep Sea Drilling Project; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Challenger (Ship)
    • Date: 1969
    • Topic: Voyages around the world; Scientific expeditions; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Oceanographic research ships; Oceanography--History
    • Format: image
  8. Joseph Matkin Portrait

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Photographs
    • Name: The Vanderwexde Light, 182 Regent St. W.; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Challenger (Ship); Matkin, Joseph, 1853-1927
    • Date: 1876
    • Topic: Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876--Photographs; Sailors--Portraits; Men--Portraits; Portrait photography
    • Format: image
  9. Substance of Professor Wyville Thompson's Lecture, to the ship's company of H.M. Ship, Challenger, on the Geography of the sea & the object of the challenger expedition. With remarks on the progress hitherto made.

    • Collection: Scripps Institution of Oceanography Letters, Clippings, Ships' Logs
    • Name: Matkin, Joseph, 1853-1927; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876; Challenger (Ship); Thomson, C. Wyville (Charles Wyville), Sir, 1830-1882; Matkin, Joseph, 1853-1927
    • Date: 1873-02-02
    • Topic: Madeira (Madeira Islands); North Atlantic Ocean; Challenger Expedition, 1872-1876
    • Format: image